The DDPai Mix3 is a 1080p dashcam based on a Sony sensor that promises excellent night video – and for the most part it delivers. This camera has noticeably better license plate legibility than many other 1080p dashcams in its price class. The built-in storage seems like an odd decision, but may make it easier for a user who does not want to buy extra memory. It also has quite a large battery.

The Keeken N56 + HL01 is a dual dashcam kit that features two real 1080p video streams, an OV4689 sensor for the front and a Sony IMX sensor for the rear. This kit is pretty close to a replacement for the Viofo A119 front facing and the A119S rear facing, at a significantly lower cost. There are a few little issues with the video quality but overall it has been solid and reliable in my time using it.

The Blueskysea B1w dashcam is based on a Sony sensor at a budget price. While the camera firmware needs some tweaking since it’s on a first firmware revision, this camera has a lot going for it for the price: 1080p at 30 FPS in h.264, a Sony sensor, and a compact form factor. It is also based on a capacitor which usually means higher reliability in hot and cold weather.

The Veckle Mini Dashcam intrigued me since it offered dual 1080p streams at a budget price (under $150 USD). Previously, dual true 1080p was only available on cameras $300+. I made a video in the past about how dual lens dash cams were not necessarily worthwhile – but the Mini 0906 may have changed my opinion. Watch the video to find out more! Full written review coming soon.

The Viofo A119S is a low profile dash camera based on the A119 form factor however there are two main differences: the camera uses an updated lens with a narrorwer field of view, and it contains a Sony imaging sensor that is capable of a max resolution of 1080p at 60 FPS.

Overall, in my opinion, it is worth the extra money for the A119 until Viofo releases a firmware update to improve the exposure rendering of the A118C2 and even then the performance can only be improved so much. The video on the A119 is sharper and it has 1080p60, as well as 1440p.

Overall, my recommendation is to spend a bit extra and get the A119 over this camera. The video quality is higher in daylight, because the A119 does a better job with colour, shadows and highlights, and the night video is close enough to call it a draw. The A118C2 is an OK camera, but there is better value available for just a little bit more money.

This camera is going to stay in my car, at least until my A119S arrives and I’ll do some comparisons between the two cams then. Vantrue has produced a cam with a nice body and decent video quality. I just wish it came in a super capacitor model so that people in extreme climates wouldn’t have to worry about taking the camera out of their car at night and could permanently install it.

At $100, this camera outperforms every other camera I’ve used in its price range, and even some cameras that are far more expensive. Viofo has a good track record of making quality devices that last a long time. That means this camera has a lot of value. It would be silly to spend more money for only a marginal increase in performance.